Referee Rant Newsletter

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Episode 130, The Rant: ozcro78 - Traveler and Basketball Official. Andrew is a bloody legend. On the spot we dis… https://t.co/Wvg5QuuRcs
19 days ago
It has been a gift to share this art and wrote on a website that’s thriving and very much alive. I thank y’all for… https://t.co/IlcFavP50j
24 days ago
Episode 128, The Rant: Wayne Grant. Long Island CYO Officiating Legend in Basketball, Effective Communicator, and o… https://t.co/CgbB9ZsjZG
25 days ago
Back to the 22 Rules. This one involves timing. In fact, we’ve been trying to find time to write it only to realize… https://t.co/met5sJ8INu
39 days ago

This is our craft.
This is our skill.
This is our voice.
We have something to say.

Referee Rant was conceived by a lowly official looking to make side $$ on the weekends. Not that he didn’t take it serious; he never thought the art of officiating could be a skill, a craft, right there for the taking – to master. Flag Football turned into softball; softball turned into Lacrosse, then Basketball. Football, Soccer, Baseball soon followed. We’re on the field. We’re on the court.

And here we are.  This is how we got here.

The Man in The Arena

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points how strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat. This is for the refs that want to rant. This is for the official that wants to elevate. This is for the ref who wants to imbue raconteur. This is for the wet-behind-the-ear-ref that needs to know the right whistle to buy. You have a seat at the table and a whistle in your mouth.

Theodore Roosevelt


Always set to work without misgivings on the score of imprudence.  Fear of failure in the mind of a performer is, for an onlooker, already evidence of failure…Actions are dangerious when there is doubt as to their wisdom; it would be safer to do nothing.

Baltasar Gracián